June is Adopt A Shelter Cat Month | Five Reasons to Adopt a Cat

June is Adopt A Shelter Cat Month | Five Reasons to Adopt a Cat

Why adopt a shelter cat? We’d love to tell you! June has been declared Adopt-A-Shelter-Cat-Month and we at Posh Pets are huge kitty lovers. Our resident cats, Baxter and Panda both came from Toronto Animal Services and they are absolutely wonderful! Baxter has been with us for three years and Panda for two and we cannot possibly imagine life without them. Every night I’m reminded, as my legs are pinned together in one place because they sleep on opposite sides, that a purr in the house makes it a home.

toronto-cat-photographer

So obviously, we are big supporters of adoption. Maybe you’re thinking about it, but maybe you’ve heard stories. So, here are five reasons to consider a shelter cat:

1. There’s a cat personality that’s just right for everyone.

I find it is a huge myth that all cats are aloof and shun human interaction. Baxter and Panda are proof-positive. I often call them my ‘puppy-cats’ because they greet us when we come home, respond to their names, love to be petted, brushed and will often cuddle up on my lap when I am working. There’s no doubt that my husband and I have created an environment where that type of behaviour flourishes, but the fact is, they were very sociable while still in the shelter. And it showed. That’s probably one of the great things of visiting a shelter to choose a kitty – there are many different breeds and personalities to choose from all in one place. Add to that, the staff usually have a good idea of the personalities, and can help you choose the perfect cat for you and your lifestyle.

toronto pet photographer

2. You’re saving a life.

Many shelters are overrun with cats looking for homes. It’s a harsh world for a cat or a kitten on the streets. Fifty percent of feral cats die within their first year and are considered ‘lucky’ if they make it past 2 years of age. Whereas, a well-cared for indoor kitty has an average lifespan of 15 years! Adopting a cat not only gives them a great life, but also saves the life of the one who now has a ‘spot’ at the shelter. That second cat now has their own chance at a forever home which, when they find it, leaves a spot for one more. Believe me, hearing the thankful, content purr of a feline friend that you share your home with, is simply amazing.

relaxing brown tabby cat pet photographer

3. Shelter and rescue cats are a good financial decision.

If you have weighed the benefits and costs of cat ownership, then getting your furry feline from a rescue or shelter makes sense. When you adopt an animal from a shelter, you are receiving the benefits of all of the work has been done before. They have had a health check, received necessary vaccines, are often spayed or neutered and have passed a behavioural assessment. They are also often sent home with a ‘starter kit’ consisting of lots of information, food, some health insurance. Plus, your adoption fee is a donation towards the medical needs of yet other animals in the rescue’s care. It all makes perfect cents!

brown tabby kitten sitting on scratching post

4. There are health benefits to owning a cat

Having a pet has shown to minimize our health risks. Everything from lowering the risk of stroke, high blood pressure, heart disease and heart attacks. Much has even been written on the health benefits of a cat’s purr – it’s certainly calming to listen to a happy kitty purring by your side. So, you’re saving a life and they, in turn, are lengthening yours.

Posh Pets Photography - Toronto's Best Cat Photographer

5. It’s a great way to support a great cause.

Rescues and shelter are doing great work helping cats live better lives. Your adoption sets a great example for those who believe that a shelter cat is somehow damaged or unhealthy. You’re helping get the word out that they are indeed loveable pets and can give so much back in return. If you are unable to adopt at this time, you can consider making a donation to a shelter or rescue that you believe in. As they say:

orange cat in tree house

Adopt. If you can’t adopt, foster. If you can’t foster, volunteer. If you can’t volunteer, donate. If you can’t donate, educate.

If you are looking to adopt a shelter cat because you want the companionship of a great cat or kitten, there are many shelter and rescue organizations within the GTA. Here are some of them:

Toronto Animal Services

Toronto Humane Society

Annex Cat Rescue

Toronto Cat Rescue

Team Cat Rescue

 

Project 52 – Silhouette | Toronto Pet Photography

Project 52 – Silhouette | Toronto Pet Photography

So…we had a visitor in our house this week. Although neither my husband or I knew it, Baxter had it all figured out.  He was fussing about, looking intently at the window. And then he simply got on the ledge to take a better look. I looked with him. Nothing. Baxter gave me this look of, listen, I am not the crazy one here. So, I looked again.

Well, right at the top of our window, behind the blinds was a tiny ladybug. How Baxter heard or saw her, I just don’t know, but he stood there looking up until we caught on.  My husband carefully caught her and set her free outside and Baxter was satisfied.

And yes, through it all I took a few images. My kitty silhouette for this week’s Project 52 theme.

silhouette-cat-at-window-looking-out

Next in the blog circle is Blue Amrich Studio in Massachusetts. Please check out her work and the rest of the talented pet photographers around the world!

Jerusalem Cats | Toronto Pet Photographer in Israel

Jerusalem Cats | Toronto Pet Photographer in Israel

Unlike the Netherlands, where we saw very few stray animals, there seems to be quite a number in Israel. Especially Jerusalem. One of the locals told us that 8 cats were originally brought in to combat the rats and now they estimate that there are 40,000 cats in Jerusalem. We have seen quite a number of them, and unfortunately, a lot of them do not look particularly healthy. It cannot be easy to be a cat on the streets in Israel.

This little girl was in within the walls of Jerusalem, looking for table scraps from the tourists. Such a polite girl too – once she had her fill, she lay down and relaxed while sharing her remaining food with another kitty. She was quiet and gentle, although a little wary of strangers.

This little guy was at Hezekiah’s Tunnel, greeting the tourists.  Seemed to be quite at home as if he owned the place! Would come over and rub against you, all the while purring. And when I called to him, he posed as if he knew this was part of the job.

We found this little guy, deep in thought, in the ancient port village of Joppa. A small, but beautiful city with cobbled streets, it is now home to art galleries, artisan shops and fantastic restaurants. All of which seem to go by unnoticed by this thoughtful feline.